'Podgaric' from the 2006-2009 Spomenik series by Jan Kempenaers


This is a digital catalogue for the Monumentalism exhibition I curated at Kudos Gallery in November 2016. The exhibiting artists were Croatian multimedia artist Igor Grubić (film), Dutch photographer Jan Kempenaers, Sydney artists Tim Bruniges (sound), Biljana Jancić (installation), Kuba Dorabialski (video), Kusum Normoyle (video) and Vienna based artist Marko Lulić (video).


This is a digital catalogue for Home@735 Invitational, an exhibition I curated in JUNE 2017. The exhibition featured artworks from the Badger & Fox Collection including photography by Andre Kertesz, Brassai, Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Garry Winogrand, Max Dupain, Olive Cotton, Bill Henson and painting by Brett Whiteley. 


Home@735 Gallery director Madeleine Preston has new sculptural works opening at Maunsell Wickes Gallery next Tuesday the 15th. Come along for drinks from 6-8pm at 19 Glenmore Road Paddington.

“…my new work uses Philip Guston's later paintings, and specifically his pallette to create forms and groupings about the trouble we find ourselves in when we allow populism to succeed. The period Guston created his Nixon series in and the Watergate crisis has resonances with today’s political climate and with the workings of the current US administration. Using media traditionally associated with the domestic - textiles and ceramics - the commentary is not literal or loud. Instead the work acts as an interloper between the internal domestic world and the external one of world politics…”

Also showing works by Gerry Wedd, Bern Emmerichs, Jane McKenzie, Valerie Restrict & The Bankstown Koori Elders Group.

Smoker series - after Guston, 2017, glazed and underglazed ceramic. Photo by @docqment

Smoker series - after Guston, 2017, glazed and underglazed ceramic. Photo by @docqment


Marko Lulić, Futurology, installation shot. Photo: maschekS.

Marko Lulić, Futurology, installation shot. Photo: maschekS.

Marko Lulić, Futurology, installation shot. Photo:maschekS.

Marko Lulić, Futurology, installation shot. Photo:maschekS.

Mid-career survey exhibition by Marko Lulić is currently showing at LENTOS Kunstmuseum Linz, Austria. Curated by Wilfried Kuehn, ‘Futurology’ consists of large scale sculpture and architectural installation. 

Since 2000, Lulić has been investigating Yugoslavian and International Modernism. He addresses the relationships of form and ideology and the relation between body and representation in different political contexts. Utopian aspects of the twentieth century are analyzed, translated and queried. Architecture and display - central themes in Lulić’s work, become the means of a restaging in the museum. The exhibition runs till September 10.


Garry Winogrand,(1928-1984), Women Are More Beautiful Than Men, silver gelatin print

Garry Winogrand,(1928-1984), Women Are More Beautiful Than Men, silver gelatin print

Home@735 Invitational closes this weekend. Last chance to see photography by Garry Winogrand (pictured), Andre Kertesz, Jacques Henri Lartigue, Brassai, Bill Henson, Olive Cotton and Max Dupain. 

 

For anyone interested in more information on Garry Winogrand and his work, please visit the ARTSY website A fantastic resource featuring Winogrand's bio, over 75 of his works, exclusive articles, and up-to-date Winogrand exhibition listings. The page also includes related artists and categories, allowing viewers to discover art beyond the Winogrand page.


Brassai, (1899-1984), Untitled (Eating at the Velodrome), circa 1932, silver gelatin print

Brassai, (1899-1984), Untitled (Eating at the Velodrome), circa 1932, silver gelatin print

Nick Collerson, Last Place, 2017, oil on canvas. 

Nick Collerson, Last Place, 2017, oil on canvas. 

Home@735 Invitational closes this weekend. Come along to see Nick Collerson's response to Brassai's, Untitled (Eating at the Velodrome), circa 1932, silver gelatin print. 


Home@735 Invitational features a number of works from the Badger & Fox Collection including photography by Bill Henson, Andre Kertesz, Jacques Henri Lartigue, Brassai, Garry Winogrand, Olive Cotton, Max Dupain and painting by Brett Whiteley. A number of Sydney artists have created responses to these works including:

Tom Polo’s The Most Elaborate Disguise (15), 2016, oil stick on paper responding to Jacques Henri Lartigue’s 40 Rue Cortambert, silver gelatin print taken in 1903. Tom Polo is represented by STATION, Melbourne.

Tom Polo, The Most Elaborate Disguise (15), 2016, oil stick on paper.

Tom Polo, The Most Elaborate Disguise (15), 2016, oil stick on paper.

Jacques Henri Lartigue, 40 Rue Cortambert, 1903, silver gelatin print.

Jacques Henri Lartigue, 40 Rue Cortambert, 1903, silver gelatin print.


Arts writer Stella Rosa McDonald delivers a great piece on Home@735 Invitational.

Our Arrangements

Brassaï: A few years ago, I was in the valley of Les Eyzies in Dordogne. I wanted to see cave art at the source. One thing surprised me: every generation, totally unaware of the ones that preceded it, nevertheless organized the cave in the same way, at a distance of thousands of years. You always find the "kitchen" in the same place.

Picasso: Nothing extraordinary about that! Man doesn't change. He keeps his habits. Instinctively, all those people found the same corner for their kitchen. To build a city, don't men choose the same sites? Under cities you always find other cities; other churches under churches, and other houses under houses. Races and religions may have changed, but the marketplace, the living quarters, pilgrimage sites, places of worship, have remained the same. Venus is replaced by the Virgin, but the same life goes on.[i]

 

I imagine Art as Brassaï’s iterative cave. I imagine Artists entering the cave and heading straight for the ‘kitchen corner’, levelling the earth and preparing the build. But the artist, in this conceit, doesn’t behave entirely like Brassaï’s common cave dweller, who remains ignorant of the home’s previous arrangements. The Artist is totally—and necessarily—aware of what came before. This knowledge is essential if they are to raise the galley again, their antecedence guides their sense. And so, they begin to arrange the kitchen once more, in the very same place, but with difference.

The idea of working ‘in response’ is not an alien task for the artist, whose arrangements form both the echo and the call. The photographer Olive Cotton (whose own 1985 photograph Pepperina Lace is re-formed here in a 2017 ceramic series by Alice Couttoupes) returned to the same subjects with heartbeat regularity in her life. The photograph Willows (1985), for example, could be the opposing view of the very same tree that is depicted in Willow Rain (1940)—and it probably was, only with 45 years in between. Cotton made careful studies of her subjects and she wrote with even greater caution around the photographs that contained them. Her notes were spare and direct and they tasked the image with the heavy lifting. There are no photographer’s notes for Pepperina Lace (1985, showing here). But from the descriptions Cotton assigned to other photographs, we can assume she might have simply noted the delicacy of the flowers and, perhaps, their equivalence to thread. Because of its small scale, Olive Cotton’s daughter Sally tells me Pepperina Lace was possibly sent out by Olive and her husband as Christmas cards for close family and friends in the 1980s. The card making was meticulous and heartfelt on the part of Cotton and her family and took around a week from print to post. Some recipients of the cards threw them away at the end of the season; others kept them carefully, and even framed them. Chance plays no small role in laying the foundations for Art’s cave.  

Beneath the city lies another city, there are churches under churches and houses resting atop the foundations of other houses. The kitchen is, now, where it has always been. We return to each other with time.

SRM

[i] Brassaï̈, Jane Marie Todd, and Henry Miller. 2002. Conversations With Picasso. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press), 92

 

Olive Cotton, (1911-2003), Pepperina, 1985, Silver gelatin print

Olive Cotton, (1911-2003), Pepperina, 1985, Silver gelatin print

Alice Couttoupes, Pepperina I & II, porcelain, steel stands. 

Alice Couttoupes, Pepperina I & II, porcelain, steel stands. 


Table Peace 2017, PET found plastics, resin, enamel paint, permanent marker, silicone, dimensions variable

Table Peace 2017, PET found plastics, resin, enamel paint, permanent marker, silicone, dimensions variable

This beautiful still life assemblage by Sarah Goffman will be showing in Home@735 Invitational opening this Thursday. The installation is Sarah’s response to Andre Kertesz’s 1970 silver gelatin print, Untitled (Still life on painted bureau). Join us for drinks from 6-8pm - 735 Bourke Street, Redfern. Pictured is Table Peace 2017, PET found plastics, resin, enamel paint, permanent marker, silicone, dimensions variable.


McLean Edwards, Art student#18, 2016, oil on canvas  

McLean Edwards, Art student#18, 2016, oil on canvas  

Home@735 Gallery is pleased to announce that we will be exhibiting works by McLean Edwards in our upcoming show opening in Thursday June the 15th.

“…painting in oil on canvas, Edwards’s works are fluid and change sometimes dramatically as those thoughts and ideas correspondingly reform. He also scribes his age in the artwork, often in the corner of the canvas as a countdown to his mortality and signature of his work. Edwards paints in an intriguing manner, his brush strokes are confident and loose and yet by contrast are reinforced with delicate lines and considered details. He skilfully makes this technique look easy, however this approach is achieved through his many years of painting full time…”

Pictured is Art student#18, 2016, oil on canvas. McLean Edwards is represented by Olsen Gallery Sydney


Brett Whiteley, (1939-1992), Figure Of A Young Man 1958, oil on board

Brett Whiteley, (1939-1992), Figure Of A Young Man 1958, oil on board

Home@735 Gallery in pleased to announce we will be exhibiting an early Brett Whiteley painting, Figure Of A Young Man 1958, oil on board in our upcoming show opening on Thursday June 15th.

Brett Whiteley (1939 – 1992) is one of Australia’s most celebrated artists. He won the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman prizes several times, and his artistic career was bolstered by his celebrity status in Australia and abroad.

Whiteley started working as a commercial artist in 1956, began life-drawing classes at the Julian Ashton Art School and joined John Santry’s sketch club where he became friends with Australian landscape painter Lloyd Rees, who was a strong influence. On weekends Whiteley painted around the towns of Bathurst, Hill End and Sofala, producing works such as Sofala 1958. In 1959 he was awarded the Italian Government Travelling Art Scholarship, which was judged by Australian artist Russell Drysdale at the Art Gallery of NSW. Whiteley remained in Europe for the next decade, exhibiting his work regularly in group exhibitions in London, Paris, Amsterdam and Berlin, establishing an international reputation. He also lived in the USA, staying at New York’s Chelsea Hotel where he socialized with celebrities such as musicians Janis Joplin and Bob Dylan.

Returning to Sydney in 1969, Whiteley moved to Lavender Bay and became involved in the Yellow House artists’ collective in Kings Cross. His work became highly collectable, in particular his Matisse influenced large-scale interiors and landscapes. In 1976 he won both the Archibald Prize for portraiture and the Sulman Prize for genre painting. The following year, he was awarded the Wynne Prize for landscape. He won all three prizes in 1978 (the first artist to do so) and the Wynne a third time in 1984. In 1991 he was awarded an Order of Australia.

Brett Whiteley died in Thirroul on the New South Wales south coast in 1992. His last studio and home in Sydney’s Surry Hills is now a museum managed by the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Located at 2 Raper Street in Surry Hills, the studio is open to the public Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, 10am-4pm.


Bill Henson, Untitled 73,74,72, C Type print

Bill Henson, Untitled 73,74,72, C Type print

Home@735 Gallery is pleased to announce we will be exhibiting artwork by photographer Bill Henson in our upcoming show. The triptych, Untitled 73,74,72 from The Badger & Fox Collection will be showing alongside paintings by Brett Whiteley, McLean Edwards and Patrick Hartigan. Join us for drinks from 6-8pm on the 15th of June.

Bill Henson (born 7 October 1955) is a visionary explorer of twilight zones, between nature and civilization, youth and adulthood, male and female.  His photographs are painterly tableaux that continue the traditions of romantic literature and painting. The use of chiaroscuro is common throughout his works, through underexposure and adjustment in printing. His photographs' use of bokeh is intended to give them a painterly atmosphere. The faces of the subjects are often blurred or partly shadowed and do not directly face the viewer.

“…his girls are young and vulnerable because they are natural metaphors for the kind of fragile beauty he wants to evoke, symbols of transient human experience that he sets against the deep void of nothingness or mortality that surrounds them. Eros and pathos are blended in a bittersweet equilibrium that requires a fine tact to avoid the pitfalls of exploitation on the one hand and sentimentality on the other…” Christopher Allen

Henson’s work has exhibited extensively nationally and internationally including the Guggenheim, the Bibliothèque Nationale, the Venice Biennale, the National Gallery of Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales.


Still LIfe Variation VI, 2016, oil on canvas by Helen Gauchat

Still LIfe Variation VI, 2016, oil on canvas by Helen Gauchat

This compelling still life painting by Helen Gauchat will be showing in Home@735 Invitational opening on Thursday the 15th of June. 

Helen Gauchat’s quietly intimate yet dynamic paintings, depicting the ceramics she has created, draw on both Eastern and Western sensibilities and belie a deep and all-encompassing understanding of her subject. At the heart of these paintings is a confident, curious and responsive gesture and an openness to chance perhaps best defined by the Japanese tea ceremony aesthetic of wabi-sabi wherein perfection is sought through imperfection. Gauchat’s exquisitely arranged tableaus of utilitarian vessels contain a subtle tension between a sense of ceremonial stability countered by one of schism and possibility. 

In 2003 Helen completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree at the National Art School followed by an Honours year at COFA. She has been a finalist in The Mosman Art Prize, The Redlands Art Prize, The Paddington Art Prize and has won the Fishers Ghost Prize for works on paper.

Pictured is Still LIfe Variation VI, 2016, oil on canvas

Helen Gauchat is represented by Defiance Gallery in Sydney


Redfern Interior, 1949, silver gelatin photograph by David Moore

Redfern Interior, 1949, silver gelatin photograph by David Moore

David Moore documented the depressed inner-city areas of Sydney, taking still photographs in the style of the documentary movement. The informal structure of 'Redfern interior' was taken when a young David Moore was mistaken for a press photographer and asked by a neighbour to take a photograph of a condemned house and squalid conditions in which the family were living. The cramped space, despair and poverty passing through three generations to a newborn baby, has little hope for change.

The matriarch, leaning on the bed, withdraws connection from the family, seemingly self-absorbed as she contemplates their bleak environment. As the mother breastfeeds, the women do not appear to notice a young photographer in the room. Each face carries equal weight, their despair palpable. The image is roughly divided into equal parts of white and black - a metaphorically representation of life and death


David Moore, Surry Hills Street, 1948, silver gelatine print

David Moore, Surry Hills Street, 1948, silver gelatine print

The first photograph to enter the collection of the NGV was Surry Hills Street, 1948 by Australian photographer David Moore (1927 – 2003). Moore began to make photographs in 1947 and this image is an outstanding example of an Australian photographer working in the social documentary style.

Between 1948 and 1951 he assisted Max Dupain, and began to develop his own approach to the documentary style, walking the streets of depressed inner-city suburbs of Sydney taking still photographs. Moore’s ‘Redfern interior’ 1949 was included in Edward Steichen’s ‘Family of Man’ exhibition, which toured internationally from 1955. He used the pictorial plane to draw disparate subjects into relationship with one another. As Judy Annear, senior curator of photographs at The Art Gallery of NSW, noted in 1997, Moore’s work is united by his ‘ongoing fascination with the structure of the image within the frame: its geometry and, within that geometry, the relationship between all the elements depicted, no matter how small they may be’. Moore’s photographs are held in Australian and international collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris, and the Smithsonian, Washington, DC.

Pictured is Surry Hills Street, 1948, silver gelatin print. We have a print of Surry Hills Street on show permanently in our entrance hall at Home@735 Gallery. Stop by some time and have a look. 


Wreath, 2017, oil on linen by McLean Edwards 

Wreath, 2017, oil on linen by McLean Edwards 

A new suite of paintings and drawings by McLean Edwards will be opening at Olsen Gruin Gallery in New York on the 13th of May. The works from ‘Marsupials’ are available at www.olsengruin.com and our New York friends can view the works at 211 Elizabeth St, NY.

Born in Darwin in 1972, McLean Edwards studied at the Canberra School of Art and had his first solo exhibition in Sydney in 1995. Known for his theatrical, darkly humorous take on figurative painting and his bold use of colour, he has had over 20 solo shows and is collected widely by private institutions across Australia and is in many International and Australian private collections.

An Australian arts reviewer stated his work has the ‘same sour humour as Samuel Beckett’s plays and prose, an absurd, theatrical sadness that celebrates idiosyncrasy while acknowledging the seeming impossibility of fighting the universe…His work is marked with a palpable sense of mortality and humility, a tragicomedy of figures and apparitions, thought-bubbles and asides, a diary of his anxieties and dreams.’ (Art Collector Australia, Issue 57 2011)

Pictured is Wreath, 2017, oil on linen. McLean Edwards is represented by Olsen Gallery Sydney.


Tea Cup Ballet by Olive Cotton

Tea Cup Ballet by Olive Cotton

Olive Cotton (1911–2003) is regarded as one of the pioneers of Australian modernist photography. Cotton's lifelong obsession with photography began with the gift of her first camera, a Kodak Box Brownie, when she was eleven. She was a childhood friend of Max Dupain's, and in 1934 she joined his photographic studio, where she made her best-known work, the angular composition Teacup Ballet in 1935. The common threads of Cotton's work are her use of light and form, keen observation skills and equal treatment of subject matter. Between 1939 and 1941 Dupain and Cotton were married, and she photographed him often; her work, Max After Surfing is frequently cited as one of the most sensuous Australian portrait photographs.

Cotton's iconic photograph Tea cup ballet taken in 1935 reappeared in Gael Newton's 1980 publication, Silver and Grey: Fifty years of Australian photography 1900-1950. The following year, her work was included in the travelling exhibition, Australian Women Photographers 1840-1960. In 1983 she reprinted 40 years worth of negatives. Sixty-six of these were exhibited in her first solo show, Olive Cotton - photographs 1924-1984. In 1991, Tea cup ballet was issued on a stamp to mark the 150th anniversary of photography in Australia. In 1993, Cotton was awarded an Emeritus Fellowship from the Australia Council. In 2000, the Art Gallery of New South Wales held Cotton's first retrospective exhibition. It featured 68 photographs ranging from vintage prints, such as Beachwear fashion shot (1938), Max after surfing (1938) and Only to taste the warmth, the light, the wind (1939), to her early 1990s works. Olive Cotton died in 2003 aged 92. The annual Olive Cotton Award is dedicated in memory of her role as one of Australia's leading twentieth century photographers.

Olive Cotton’s work Pepperina shot in 1985 from the Badger & Fox Collection will be showing at Home@735 Gallery in our June exhibition. Sydney artist Alice Couttoupes has created a ceramic piece in response to the photograph. The two works will be show alongside one another in the exhibition. 


40 Rue Cortambert by Jacques Henri Lartigue

40 Rue Cortambert by Jacques Henri Lartigue

40 Rue Cortambert by Jacques Henri Lartigue will be on show at Home@735 Gallery in June. One of 9 artworks from the Badger & Fox Collection, the photograph taken in 1903 will hang alongside a painting by Tom Polo responding to Lartigue’s print.

 

Jacques-Henri Lartigue (1894-1986) was a French photographer and painter noted for the spontaneous photographs he took beginning in his childhood and continuing throughout his life. Lartigue’s boyhood photographs were almost always candid images taken of his family and friends. Lartigue studied painting at the Académie Julian in Paris from 1915 to 1916. Born into privilege, Lartigue's father was a banker, and the family belonged to the upper French bourgeoisie. He was afforded time to build race cars, oil paint, and learn the mechanics of photography from an early age.

Lartigue photographed everyone he came in contact with. His most frequent muses were his three wives, and his mistress of the early 1930s, the Romanian model Renée Perle. His photographic work came into art world prominence in 1962 when a meeting with curator John Szarkowski led to a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The importance of the work was immediately recognized, and numerous exhibitions and publications followed.

During his life, he was friends with influential artists such as Jean Cocteau, Pablo Picasso and Kees van Dongen, and has served as an important influence to later filmmakers, notably Wes Anderson. Lartigue’s work can be found in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, among others. Lartigue was made a chevalier of the Legion of Honour in 1975. A collection of his work, Diary of a Century, was published in 1970 (reprinted 1978). Later collections of Lartigue’s work include Les Femmes aux cigarettes (1980; Women Holding Cigarettes) and Les Autochromes de J.-H. Lartigue, 1912–1927 (1980; The Autochromes of J.H. Lartigue, 1912–1927). He continued to photograph into his 90s


Madeleine and I walked down Bourke Street yesterday to Artspace for a studio visit with Sydney artist Tom Polo. Tom gave us the lowdown on his Brett Whiteley Travelling Art Scholarship and his 3 months at the cité. Tom also generously gave Madeleine a few ideas on how to navigate her AGNSW residency at the cité later this year. We also got a preview of new works for Tom’s upcoming show at Station Gallery in Melbourne. 

We are thrilled that Tom will be painting a response to the Jacques-Henri Lartigue photograph titled 40 Rue Cortambert taken in 1903 for Home@735 Invitational. The two works will be shown alongside one another. The Lartigue photograph is one of 9 artworks from the Badger & Fox Collection we will be exhibiting - the show opens on Thursday the 15th of June. 

artworks by Tom Polo

artworks by Tom Polo


Eating at the Velodrome, 1932 by Brassai

Eating at the Velodrome, 1932 by Brassai

Eating at the Velodrome, circa 1932 by Brassai will be showing in Home@735 Invitational opening on Thursday the 15th of June. This is one of 9 works from The Badger & Fox Collection we will be exhibiting including photography by Brassai, Lartigue, Kertesz, Max Dupain and Bill Henson. 

Sydney artist Nick Collerson will be painting a response to Brassai’s ’Eating at the Velodrome’. The two works will be shown alongside one another in Home@735 Invitational opening in June.

 

Born Gyula Halász (1899 – 1984), the French photographer Brassai took his name from his hometown of Brassó in Transylvania – now Brasov in Romania. Brassai studied art at the academies of Budapest and Berlin before coming to Paris in the mid-twenties.

Brassaï’s love affair with Paris started at Montparnasse. The pulsating heart of art in Paris, the district was also known as one of its most colourful; its night-time population a kaleidoscope of petty criminals, hoodlums, streetwalkers and pleasure seekers. Brassaï’s first project seized the essence of nocturnal Paris in a series of grainy, textured pictures which set the basis for early street photography. Published in 1933 with the title ‘Paris de nuit’, this portfolio remains the most famous exploration of the city’s hidden underbelly and is considered a classic of early street photography. His series of photo-books of Paris graffiti have also been hugely influential.

One of the most renowned photographers of the interwar period, Brassaï’s reputation was built on contributions to both commercial and avant-garde photography. His long-time friend, the author Henry Miller, nicknamed him “The Eye of Paris” for his devotion to the city.

He was close to many artists including Dali, Picasso, Matisse and Giacometti – many of whom are portrayed in his collection ‘The Artists of My Life’  published in 1982. His relationship with Picasso produced many famous portraits of the artist, as well as important publications including ‘Conversations with Picasso’. The book is a compilation of the photographer’s diary entries in which the image of wartime Paris stands alongside unknown aspects of the personality of Picasso himself. Unable to wander the city streets under the curfew imposed by the German occupiers, Brassaï dedicated the early ‘40s to photographing the works of Picasso in his studio, creating a unique photo-chronicle of the artist’s creative output.


I had a very enjoyable studio visit yesterday with Sydney artist Nick Collerson. Apart from a sneak preview of his compelling new works for his upcoming solo exhibition, ‘Mix’ at Liverpool Street Gallery, we talked about Nick’s motivations for making art, critique, art education, Benjamin and a few of the issues our world will have to deal with in the near future. Along with his paintings, Nick’s studio has a drum kit and a Fender Thinline guitar - we finished the visit off with a jam on a few songs…perfect morning really. 

Nick will be painting a response to a photographic work by Brassai from the Badger & Fox Collection titled ’Eating at the Velodrome’ taken in 1932. The two works will be shown alongside one another in Home@735 Invitational opening on June 15th.

Painting by Nick Collerson for his upcoming exhibition 'Mix' at Liverpool Street Gallery.

Painting by Nick Collerson for his upcoming exhibition 'Mix' at Liverpool Street Gallery.


Video still from Hypnotised Into Being, (A Self Portrait) 2016, HD digital video 16:9, colour, no sound, Edition of 3 + 2 AP.

Video still from Hypnotised Into Being, (A Self Portrait) 2016, HD digital video 16:9, colour, no sound, Edition of 3 + 2 AP.

Sydney-based artist Kate Mitchell will be exhibiting her video work ‘Hypnotised Into Being’ in Home@735 Invitational opening on Thursday the 15th of June. For this work Mitchell enlisted a hypnotist to induce her into a sub-conscious state and prompt her to respond to a selection of statements that she had earlier provided. Initially approaching the session with a degree of cynicism, the artist was later amazed that she had indeed been induced into a subliminal state. Mitchell physically enacts various prompts related to art history, critical discourse and her own practice, as if playing a game of charades in a hypnotised state. ‘Hypnotised Into Being’ will be showing in our video booth alongside paintings by Patrick Hartigan, Mclean Edwards, Brett Whiteley and photography by Bill Henson. 

Selected exhibitions include In Time, Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne (2015); Magic Undone, Artspace, Sydney (2012); and Future Fallout, Chalk Horse, Sydney (2014), Primavera, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2012); Contemporary Australia: Women, Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (2012); The Grip / La Mainmise, Kadist Art Foundation, Paris (2010); and The Horn of Plenty: excess and reversibility, Para Site, Hong Kong (2009).

Kate Mitchell is represented by Anna Schwartz Gallery in Melbourne and Chalk Horse Gallery in Sydney.


Sarah Goffman, Plastic Arts, 2009, The Good, The Bad, The Muddy, Mori Gallery photo: Mike Myers.  

Sarah Goffman, Plastic Arts, 2009, The Good, The Bad, The Muddy, Mori Gallery photo: Mike Myers.

 

Andre Kertesz, Untitled (Still life on painted bureau), circa 1970, silver gelatin print 

Andre Kertesz, Untitled (Still life on painted bureau), circa 1970, silver gelatin print 

Sydney based artist Sarah Goffman will be exhibiting in Home@735 Invitational opening on Thursday June the 15th. Sarah will be creating a still life assemblage in response to the Andre Kertesz photograph, Untitled (Still life on painted bureau), circa 1970, silver gelatin print - available at Badger & Fox Gallery

“…I make what I want to own. And of course, I try to make what I want to see.  Sometimes I make work in reaction to other people’s works, or in response to a time, a place, a substance and sometimes in response to myself.  When I consider a space, I try to find the perfect response, the response that will highlight the past and it’s tension with today…” 

Sarah Goffman’s current exhibition,  I am a 3-D Printer at the Wollongong Art Gallery runs till June 18th. Pictured is Plastic Arts, 2009, The Good, The Bad, The Muddy, Mori Gallery photo: Mike Myers.

 

André Kertész (2nd July 1894 - 28th September 1985) was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and his efforts in developing the photo essay. His ability to compose lyrical images, infused with wit and insight would remain a constant throughout his career. Neither a surrealist or a strict photojournalist, Kertész combined a street photographer’s dry humour and eye for the moment with the formal aesthetic of a modernist in his black and white photography. In addition to the street life of Paris, he also photographed many famous artists including Chagall and Mondrian. In 1964 his photography was featured in a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art. The work of Kertész was featured in many exhibitions throughout the world, exhibiting into his early nineties. Pictured is Untitled (Still life on painted bureau), circa 1970, silver gelatin print available at Badger & Fox Gallery www.badgerandfoxgallery.com


Garry Winogrand, (American, 1928-1984), Women Are More Beautiful Than Men, Silver gelatine print

Garry Winogrand, (American, 1928-1984), Women Are More Beautiful Than Men, Silver gelatine print

Born in New York in 1928 where he lived and worked much of his life, street photographer Garry Winogrand was lauded for his portrayal of American life and its social issues in the mid-20th century. He received three Guggenheim Fellowships to work on personal projects, a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and published four books during his lifetime. He was one of three photographers featured in the influential New Documents exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in ’67 and had solo exhibitions at MOMA in 1969, 1977 and 1988. In 2013 the San Francisco Museum of Art staged a major retrospective exhibition with over 160 photographs of Winogrand’s work. The exhibition was shown at venues including the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Jeu de Paume in Paris and Fundacíon MAPFRE in Madrid, Spain. 

Winogrand's output was prodigious. At his death, he left behind 2500 undeveloped rolls of 36-exposure 35mm film, 6,500 rolls of film that had been developed but not printed and 300 unedited 35mm contact sheets - that’s at least 300,000 images – equal to at least two life's work for other photographers. Garry Winogrand died at the age of 56.

Women Are More Beautiful Than Men, Silver gelatine print by Garry Winogrand from the Badger & Fox Gallery Collection will showing in the Home@735 Invitational exhibition opening on June 15th.


Still life painting by Queensland based artist Helene Grove will be showing at Home@735 Gallery in our Invitational exhibition. White Teapot, 2006, synthetic polymer on board is one of works from the Badger & Fox Collection we will be exhibiting opening on June 15th. Helen Grove won the Portia Geach Prize in 2013 and has been a finalist in the Moran, Wynne, Archibald and Dobell Drawing Prize.

Helene Grove, White Teapot, 2006, synthetic polymer on board

Helene Grove, White Teapot, 2006, synthetic polymer on board


Max Dupain is one of Australia's most revered photographers. He developed an influential style of commercial photography that emphasised the geometric forms of his architectural and industrial subjects. Born in Sydney in 1911, he lived there all his life, photographing the city from the late 1930s. 

For many Australians, Dupain's photographs define beach culture, and it was the beach that was the inspiration for his most famous and enduring images. A dedicated patriot, he believed in clearly and simply showing Australia's way of life. His 1937 photograph ‘The Sunbaker’, shot at Bondi Beach, became an icon that enjoyed worldwide recognition.

His early work was fairly conventional pictorial imagery, but by the mid-1930s he had broken away and taken up a Modernist, realist style, experimenting with light and formal composition.

From the 1950s Dupain specialised in architectural photography, which is the finest of his professional work. He developed a close working relationship with prominent architects including Harry Seidler, Philip Cox and Glenn Murcutt.

Dupain's philosophy could be summed up in two words, simplicity and directness. Dupain remained an adherent of black and white photography, he believed that colour was restricting in its objectivity and that nothing was left for individual interpretation. 

In 1939, Dupain married photographer and childhood friend Olive Cotton, but they divorced soon after. A decade later, Dupain married Diana Illingworth and subsequently they had a daughter Danina and a son Rex, who also became a photographer. Dupain was given an OBE in the New Year's honours list, 1981. His photographs are held in most of the major galleries around Australia and as well by private collectors world-wide. Dupain continued working until his death in 1992 aged 81.

Roadside Stall Princes Highway by Max Dupain is one of the artworks from the Badger & Fox Collection we will be exhibiting at Home@735 Gallery in June. The show opens on Thursday the 15th, join us for drinks from 6-8pm. 

 

Max Dupain (1911-1992), Roadside Stall Princes Highway, Vintage Silver Gelatin Photograph

Max Dupain (1911-1992), Roadside Stall Princes Highway, Vintage Silver Gelatin Photograph


Had a great studio visit yesterday with Sydney artist Mclean Edwards. We are thrilled to be exhibiting two of Mclean’s compelling portraits in our Invitational exhibition opening on Thursday the 15th of June. McLean Edwards studied at the Canberra School of Art. Since that time he has exhibited his work in numerous group and solo shows including the Archibald Prize at the AGNSW in 2004, 2006, 2007, 2010 and 2013. His artworks are held in collections including 1346 Venice Collection, Australian War Memorial Museum, Canberra, Newcastle Region Art Gallery, Newcastle, Allens Arthur Robinson, Germanos Collection, Sydney, Artbank, Bond University, BHP Collection, Deutsche Bank, Hong Kong investors, PT Kodel (Indonesia), University of Queensland Art Museum and private Collections in Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, UK and U.S.A.

Mclean Edwards is represented by Olsen Gallery Sydney.

Check out available paintings by Mclean Edwards at Olsen Gallery

Mclean Edwards' studio in Sydney

Mclean Edwards' studio in Sydney


Steve Cox, Study of a Young Man, 2002, oil on canvas

Steve Cox, Study of a Young Man, 2002, oil on canvas


Opening on Thursday June the 15th, Home@735 Invitational will feature a selection of small portraits. One of the works is by Melbourne artist Steve Cox

UK based Melbourne painter and writer Steve Cox is best known for his psychologically penetrating images of young men. His work ranges from portraiture to narratives to what he describes as stream of consciousness landscapes. He writes art-related and queer-related articles and reviews for a number of publications. He studied painting at the Victorian College of the Arts from where one of his main lecturers was Gareth Sansom. In 1983 he was awarded the Keith & Elisabeth Murdoch Travelling Fellowship and subsequently spent eighteen months making work in London and Cairo. In 1983 he was included in the survey of Australian art, Perspecta, at the Art Gallery of New South Wales

Cox’s work is held in The National Gallery of Australia, The National Gallery of Victoria, The Ian Potter Foundation, Melbourne, The estate of Francis Bacon, London and The estate of Reggie Kray, London. His work has been featured in Nevill Drury's New Art series of books, and in Sonia Payes' Untitled, a book of photographic portraits of contemporary Australian artists.


 

Performing Dog 1930’s, Silver gelatin print by French photographer Brassai will be featured in our June exhibition - Home@735 ‘Invitational’.  The show will feature works from a prominent Sydney collection by some of the seminal photographers of the 20th century including Brassai, Andre Kertesz, Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Max Dupain, Bill Henson and painting by Brett Whiteley. We will also be inviting a number of Sydney artists to contribute one of their works to be included in the exhibition across portaiture/figuartion, still life and landscape. You can see a portion of the collection at the online gallery https://badgerandfoxgallery.com

Born Gyula Halász (9th September 1899 - 8th July 1984), the French photographer Brassai took his name from his hometown of Brassó in Transylvania - now Brasov in Romania. Brassai studied art at the academies of Budapest and Berlin before coming to Paris in the mid-twenties. 

Brassaï’s love affair with Paris started at Montparnasse. The pulsating heart of art in Paris, the district was also known as one of its most colourful; its night-time population a kaleidoscope of petty criminals, hoodlums, streetwalkers and pleasure seekers. Brassaï’s first project seized the essence of nocturnal Paris in a series of grainy, textured pictures which set the basis for early street photography. Published in 1933 with the title ‘Paris de nuit', this portfolio remains the most famous exploration of the city's hidden underbelly and is considered a classic of early street photography. His series of photo-books of Paris graffiti have also been hugely influential.

One of the most renowned photographers of the interwar period, Brassaï's reputation was built on contributions to both commercial and avant-garde photography. His long-time friend, the author Henry Miller, nicknamed him "The Eye of Paris" for his devotion to the city. 

He was close to many artists including Dali, Picasso, Matisse and Giacometti - many of whom are portrayed in his collection ‘The Artists of My Life’  published in 1982. His relationship with Picasso produced many famous portraits of the artist, as well as important publications including ‘Conversations with Picasso’. The book is a compilation of the photographer’s diary entries in which the image of wartime Paris stands alongside unknown aspects of the personality of Picasso himself. Unable to wander the city streets under the curfew imposed by the German occupiers, Brassaï dedicated the early ‘40s to photographing the works of Picasso in his studio, creating a unique photo-chronicle of the artist’s creative output.

Brassai (Gyula Halasz 1899-1984), Performing Dog 1930’s, Silver gelatin print.

Brassai (Gyula Halasz 1899-1984), Performing Dog 1930’s, Silver gelatin print.


Patrick Hartigan, Charted, 2013, oil on board

Patrick Hartigan, Charted, 2013, oil on board

Charted, 2013, oil on board by Patrick Hartigan will be one of the works featured in Home@735 Invitational in June. The exhibition will focus on a selection of the works from the Badger & Fox Gallery Collection - https://badgerandfoxgallery.com - including works by some of the seminal photographers of the 20th century including Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Andre Kertesz, Brassai, Gary Winogrand and Bill Henson. 

Patrick Hartigan’s practice brings together drawings, paintings, film and written work made in response to his experiences of domesticity, travel and found imagery. Patrick Hartigan is the art critic for The Saturday Paper.

“…painting has been, and continues to be, central to my process but I continue to enjoy working across different media. Painting is a more visceral medium than others and therefore feels more suited to the mess and complexities of people…”

His work is held in collections including the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth; the Chartwell Collection, Auckland City Art Gallery, New Zealand; and Wollongong University, New South Wales, Australia.


My partner, artist Madeleine Preston and I will be curating a show - Home@735 ‘Invitational’ - opening on Thursday June the 15th. The exhibition will feature works from a prominent Sydney collection by some of the seminal photographers of the 20th century including Andre Kertesz, Brassai, Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Max Dupain, Bill Henson and painting by Brett Whiteley. We will also be inviting a number of Sydney artists to contribute one of their works to be included in the exhibition across portaiture/figuartion, still life and landscape. You can see the works at the online gallery Badger Fox Gallery.  

Pictured is Andre Kertesz (Hungarian American, 1894-1985) Untitled

 

André Kertész (2nd July 1894 - 28th September 1985) was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and his efforts in developing the photo essay. His ability to compose lyrical images, infused with wit and insight would remain a constant throughout his career. Neither a surrealist or a strict photojournalist, Kertész combined a street photographer’s dry humour and eye for the moment with the formal aesthetic of a modernist in his black and white photography. In addition to the street life of Paris, he also photographed many famous artists including Chagall and Mondrian.

He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925. Due to persecution of the Jews and the threat of WWII, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940’s and 1950’s he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods; the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and toward the end of his life, the International period.

In 1946, Kertész had a solo exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, featuring photographs from his Day of Paris series. In 1952, he and his wife moved to a 12th-floor apartment near Washington Square Park, the setting for some of his most iconic photographs. His late life Polaroids taken from within his apartment re-explored his concepts of life, love, and loss generated by his reaction to the hand-held camera itself.

In 1964 his photography was featured in a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art. With his work critically acclaimed, Kertész gained recognition in the photographic world as an important artist. The work of Kertész was featured in many exhibitions throughout the world, exhibiting into his early nineties.


Thanks to Brett East - @docqment - for his documentation of the exhibition. 

Monumentalism - installation shot

Monumentalism - installation shot


I was interviewed on ABC Radio by presenter and Fairfax journalist, Jacqueline Maley. The show, 'Sunday Afternoon', went to air yesterday. Here is a link to the podcast: Sunday Afternoon on ABC Radio.


Thanks to everyone who came to the Monumentalism opening. Here is a video featuring image of opening night and works by the exhibiting artists. The vision is set to the sound of my band The Forresters - the song is 'Never Too Far' by the late and great Tim Hardin. 


During the 1970’s, the Yugoslav government produced a sticker book - titled ‘Spomenici Revolucije’ - featuring stickers of 252 monuments. Similar to collecting footy cards, school children were encouraged to buy stickers of anti-fascist modernist monuments at local kiosks to fill up their sticker books. This was an attempt by the government to try to install a feeling of unity and togetherness in the youth of new Socialist Republic. The first school with all the students’ albums completed would win a trip to the most important monuments: second prize was a colour TV set.


The compelling single channel video ‘All of Them in There' by Sydney artist and writer Kuba Dorabialski will be one of 5 projections showing in Monumentalism. ‘All of Them in There’ is a video installation and essay film, shot in Serbia, Macedonia, Bulgaria and Romania during October 2015.

 

Kuba Dorabialski presents a political ecology in an architectural landscape. ‘All of Them in There’ is a filmic dialogue between city and household, where concrete, walls, multilayered floors and staircases, repetitive balconies and windows, are (ex)changed via the crowd, observed by the narrator.” - Ashley Haywood

'Sofia' - video still from Kuba Dorabialski's 'All of them in There', 2015, single channel video.

'Sofia' - video still from Kuba Dorabialski's 'All of them in There', 2015, single channel video.


Croatian-born Sydney based artist Biljana Jančić will be creating a site-specific installation as part of Monumentalism opening at Kudos Gallery next Tuesday the 8th of November. Currently exhibiting work at the MCA’s Primavera and Tarra Warra Biennial 2016 curated by Helen Hughes and Victoria Lyn, Biljana has exhibited extensively including exhibitions at Artspace and Stills Gallery. She is the recipient of the 2016 Fauvette Loureiro Memorial Artists Travel Award.

Jančić’s large-scale architectural interventions investigate the way in which subjects and objects inscribe, delineate or territorialise sites. Her artworks operate as punctures that highlight, amplify or distort existing architectural features. These interventions can be seen as parallel to interferences in virtual spaces, where phenomena such as glitches and other ‘errors’ create an awareness of the fragility that belies the structures that organise our lives. 

Biljana Jancić completed her Bachelor of Visual Arts in 2007 and PhD in 2013, both at Sydney College of the Arts. Her art making practice is supported by her critical writing and curatorial practice.

Biljana Jančić, A Beach (Beneath), 2016, installation view, Primavera 2016: Young Australian Artists, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney, 2016, silver tape, projections

Biljana JančićA Beach (Beneath), 2016, installation view, Primavera 2016: Young Australian Artists, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney, 2016, silver tape, projections


Losing all four of his brothers to the fascist execution squads in World War II, abstract sculptor Vojin Bakić was a significant figure in the context of Croatian and European modernism in the second half of the 20th century.

In the early 60’s, Bakić became a prominent figure in abstract expression and optical research. His vision and creativity resulted in a decisive change in the way large memorial monuments in the former Yugoslavia were designed.

His public monuments Dotrscina, Kamensko and Petrova Gora were exceptional examples of modernist public sculpture, displaying a departure from socialist aesthetics. During the Balkans War in the 90’s these memorials were neglected or destroyed.

Bakić’s most famous project was the memorial centre at Petrova Gora southwest of Zagreb. The 37 metre high stainless steel structure comprising angles and curves was completed in 1981. Holding an exhibition space and a café, the outlandish memorial was visited by school trips and work outings from all over Yugoslavia. The interior was devastated and looted after 1991, and the stainless steel panels covering the exterior of the memorial were stolen by locals. 

Vojin Bakic died in 1992 in Zagreb.

Petrova Gora - image by Jan Kempenaers - monument by Vojin Bakic

Petrova Gora - image by Jan Kempenaers - monument by Vojin Bakic

Dotrščina designed by Vojin Bakic

Dotrščina designed by Vojin Bakic


 

Visual artist and musician Tim Bruniges will be creating a site-responsive sound installation as part of Monumentalism, opening at Kudos Gallery on the 8th of November. Working across a range of media including installation, sound and video, his practice is focused on exploring sound and space and their relationship with time. Bruniges’ site-specific sound work will use live input, amplification and manipulated feedback.

 

Bruniges is a current PhD candidate at the UNSW Art & Design. In 2013 he was awarded the Greene St. Studio artist residency by the Australia Council for the Arts and is a finalist in the NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (Emerging) 2016. 

Tim Bruniges | MIRRORS (2014) | concrete, microphones, speakers | infinite duration | installation view SIGNAL New York

Tim Bruniges | MIRRORS (2014) | concrete, microphones, speakers | infinite duration | installation view SIGNAL New York


Bogdan Bogdanovic (1922–2010) the Yugoslav architect, urbanist, writer, and politician, designed some of the most remarkable memorials in Europe. Some of the most renowned works are Flower of Stone (1966), a memorial for the victims of the concentration camp in Jasenovac, the Dudik Memorial Park for the Victims of Fascism in Vukovar, Mound of the Unbeaten in Prilep Macedonia and standing in the form of some lost Roman addition to Stonehenge, Mitrovica
Bogdanović taught architecture at the University of Belgrade, where he also served as dean. He was also involved in politics - as a partisan in WWII, and later as mayor of Belgrade. When Slobodan Milosević rose to power and nationalism took hold in Yugoslavia, Bogdanović became a dissident.

Jan Kempenaers, Mitrovića from his 2010 publication 'Spomenik'. Standing in the form of some lost Roman addition to Stonehenge, Bogdanović's huge concrete monument in the town of Mitrovica is a homage to those who were lost during fighting in World War II.

Jan Kempenaers, Mitrovića from his 2010 publication 'Spomenik'.
Standing in the form of some lost Roman addition to Stonehenge, Bogdanović's huge concrete monument in the town of Mitrovica is a homage to those who were lost during fighting in World War II.

Mound of the Unbeaten is in the Park of the Revolution, in Prilep Macedonia. The monument was built in 1961 in commemoration of the victims of the People’s Liberation Struggle in Macedonia.The complex consists of a series of marble Urns. The largest urn in complex has the symbol of the eternal flame, symbolising the struggle for freedom for the Macedonian people.

Mound of the Unbeaten is in the Park of the Revolution, in Prilep Macedonia. The monument was built in 1961 in commemoration of the victims of the People’s Liberation Struggle in Macedonia.The complex consists of a series of marble Urns. The largest urn in complex has the symbol of the eternal flame, symbolising the struggle for freedom for the Macedonian people.

Dudik Memorial Park built in 1980 in Vukovar, Croatia

Dudik Memorial Park built in 1980 in Vukovar, Croatia


Installation view Accord with Air: Tjentište (2012) Peleton Gallery, Sydney. Image courtesy of the artist. Photo by Adrian Gerbers.

Installation view Accord with Air: Tjentište (2012) Peleton Gallery, Sydney. Image courtesy of the artist. Photo by Adrian Gerbers.


I caught the AGNSW Art Bus in early 2013 - visiting a number of Sydney galleries, the last stop on route was Peleton. Exhibited, was a video/sound work and photographic prints by Kusum Normoyle entitled, Accord with Air: Tjentište (2012), which features Normoyle performing alongside the Tjentište monument in the Sutjeska National Park in Eastern Bosnia-Herzegovina. It’s a compelling piece of work that also struck a chord with me, as the Tito commissioned monument designed by sculptor Miodrag Živković is not that far from where some of my family originates.

Kusum’s performative style is incisive, extreme, abrasive and primal. Armed with a microphone and amplifier and using her physique - kicking, contorting and throwing her body on the ground; she creates loud, often public or architecturally/site specific performances. Normoyle’s work utilises extreme voice, audio feedback and the body’s relationship to materials and environment through these means for both performance and installation. 

She is currently a PhD candidate at UNSW Art and Design under the supervision of Douglas Kahn and is an active member of the Sound and Materials Research Group at UNSW Art and Design

Her work has been included in numerous exhibitions, festivals and events including Dark Mofo 2015, Primavera: Young Australian Artists, MCA Sydney 2013, ISSUE Project Room NYC, Superdeluxe at Artspace for the 17th Biennale of Sydney, Liquid Architecture AU, the NOWnow AU, N.K Berlin, UrBANGUILD JPN, Lines of Flight Festival NZ, and Dogodek: The Event, 29th Biennial of Graphic Art, Slovenia.

Spomenik#16.jpg

Jan Kempenaers, Tjentište from his 2010 publication 'Spomenik'.

One of the bloodiest battles in which the Partisans engaged against joint German-Italian forces was the Battle of Sutjeska. Also known as The Fifth Offensive, and "Operation Schwarz” the battle took place between 15 May and 15 June in eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina. On June the 9th, President Tito was severely injured when a bomb fell near the leading group. During the months of struggle over 7,500 of Partisan fighters of the Main Operational Group of Yugoslavian National-Liberation Army were killed. The Tjentište monument was built in 1971 and designed by sculptor Miodrag Živković.

The Tjentište monument also appears as one of the nine meditative portraits in the poetic-experimental documentary ‘Monument’ by Croatian multimedia artist Igor Grubić and has been photographed by Dutch photographer Jan Kempenaers in his 2010 publication ‘Spomenik’. Both Grubić and Kempenaers works will be showing in Monumentalism.


Brutalist architecture proliferated from the 1950’s to the mid-70’s descending from modernist architecture in the early 20th century. The term ‘Brutalism’ originated from the French word for ‘raw’ used by the finest exponent of brutalist architecture Le Corbusier describing his choice of material béton brut (raw concrete). 

Brutalism became widely used due to the speed and cheapness of construction. It’s an architectural philosophy often associated with socialist utopian ideology. This style is prominent in European communist countries including Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Germany, USSR and Yugoslavia. 

The memorials featured in Monumentalism are exceptional examples of Brutalist architecture from the former Yugoslavia. The exhibition opens at Kudos Gallery on Tuesday the 8th of November. Here are a few striking examples of Brutalism.

Druzhba Holiday Centre Hall Yalta in the Ukraine (1984)

Druzhba Holiday Centre Hall Yalta in the Ukraine (1984)

Western Gate of Belgrade in Novi Beograd. Also known at present as Genex Tower.

Western Gate of Belgrade in Novi Beograd. Also known at present as Genex Tower.

Georgian Ministry of Highways, USSR, 1970

Georgian Ministry of Highways, USSR, 1970


A still from Jasenovac, 2010 by Marko Lulić - image courtesy of Gabriele Senn Gallery and the artist.

A still from Jasenovac, 2010 by Marko Lulić - image courtesy of Gabriele Senn Gallery and the artist.

My partner Madeleine Preston met Austrian artist Marko Lulić at the 2014 Sydney Biennale when he exhibited his video, ’Space Girl Dance’. Through their meeting I started a communication with Marko. Our two families originate from the same region of Croatia. Early this year Marko sent me a link to his latest video work ‘Kosmaj Monument’ (2015). The video was part of a two-person exhibition at the MAK Center in Los Angeles. The exhibition ‘Spomenici revolucije’ - was a collaboration with LA artist, Sam Durant

Spomenici revolucije was the title from a Yugoslavian sticker album from the 1970s, produced for children who were encouraged to buy stickers of anti-fascist modernist monuments to fill up their albums. The first school with all the students’ albums completed would win a trip to the most important monuments, second place winning a color TV set.

Lulić’s video features interpretive dance in conjunction with the Kosmaj monument located in present-day Serbia. Lulić juxtaposes the flux of bodies in movement with the static and imposing aspects of modernist monuments. The six free standing 40 metre high structures comprising the monument, commemorates the 5,000 partisans killed fighting against the German occupation in Southern Belgrade.

Dancers are shown creating contact through improvisation, while trying to establish a dialogue with the shapes of this specific icon. The video was shot at a cultural center in nearby Belgrade, an area with state-owned student homes built during the same era as the monument— both sites employed raw concrete to represent their respective utopian period.

Lulić has created a number of videos in the last few years with dancers interacting with public sculptures, seeing those works as both performances and expanded sculptural pieces that analyze and grasp the historic and socio-politcal essence of the objects they explore.

Marko Lulić is a Vienna-based artist, whose work is concerned with the intersection of architectural modernism, ideology, and aesthetics. Lulić has remade a number of modernist monuments, as well as reactivated them in some form by using those public sculptures as reference and/or location of his performances. He has exhibited extensively nationally and internationally at the Storefront for Art and Architecture, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Belgrade; Oldenburger Kunstverein, MAK, Vienna; Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam; Kunsthalle Vienna; Museum of Contemporary Art, Zagreb; Migros Museum of Contemporary Art, Zurich; 21er Haus / Belvedere, Vienna; Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz, Kunstverein Heilbronn, Grazer Kunstverein, Kunsthalle St. Gallen and Frankfurter Kunstverein. His work was included in The Biennale of Sydney; the 12th Swiss Sculpture Exhibition, Biel / Bienne; the October Salon, Belgrade, and the Chicago Architecture Biennial. In recent years he has also curated several exhibitions at the Secession, Vienna; Siemens Arts Program, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Belgrade. He won several awards such as the Kardinal König Kunstpreis, the Award of the Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach Foundation, and the Erich Hauser Foundation Award. For the last five years he has taught at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Lulić is represented by Gabriele Senn Gallery.

 

Niš monument in southern Serbia - still from 'All of Them in There' by Kuba Dorabialski

Niš monument in southern Serbia - still from 'All of Them in There' by Kuba Dorabialski

Sydney based artist and writer Kuba Dorabialski will be exhibiting his compelling poetic single channel video ‘All of Them in There’ as part of the ‘Monumentalism’ exhibition opening at Kudos Gallery on Tuesday the 8th of November. Shot in Serbia, Macedonia, Bulgaria and Romania during October 2015, ‘All of Them in There’ was first shown at Firstdraft in February 2016. Born in Wroclaw Poland, Dorabialski’s interest in the aesthetics of Eastern European politics stems in part from his background and from his interest in the violence the capitalist state wreaks on its citizens. This work speaks to the utopic elements of socialism and the failure of market based capitalism to effectively replace the system it so derides. 

 

‘All of Them in There’ features architecture from Eastern European states including one of the Tito commissioned monuments. Niš – located in southern Serbia - depicts three concrete obelisks in the form of raised fists. Designed by Ivan Sabolić and built in 1963, the memorial commemorates the 10,000 victims of fascism killed at Bubanj plateau between 1941 and 1944.

Still from the film Monument by Igor Grubić 

Still from the film Monument by Igor Grubić 

Croatian multimedia artist Igor Grubić will be exhibiting his 2015 film Monument at Kudos Gallery in November. Monument is a poetic-experimental documentary, structured as a series of nine meditative ‘portraits’ of the massive concrete memorials commissioned by the former Yugoslav state. These sentinel forms were originally built to honour the Second World War victims of fascism.

His work includes site-specific interventions in public spaces, performances, photography and video works. He is known for his activism and his consideration of the public space as a means of expression. In 2000, he started working as a producer and writer of documentaries, tv reportages and socially committed commercials. His work has been exhibited extensively across Europe and at Monash University Museum of Art - ‘Concrete’ curated by Geraldine Kirrihi Barlow in 2014 and in 'Zero tolerance', MOMA PS1, NY in 2015.


Madeleine’s mother, Yvonne Preston was a foreign correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald. The Walkley Award winning journalist and her family spent a number of years living in China during the final period of Chairman Mao’s rule. Madeleine’s formative years were spent as one of a handful of foreign students living in Beijing through this turbulent era.

As part of her appointment, Yvonne Preston interviewed an array of leaders, dictators and despots visiting Beijing including Pol Pot, Yasser Arafat, Sadam Hussein and President of Yugoslavia, Marshall Tito. 

The photo above was taken when Tito visited China in 1977, just prior their interview.

Tito was a master of playing both sides of politics - East and West. As the President of the Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia (SRY) for 37 years, Tito had huge support from the West due to his tempered partiality to capitalism. Tito’s openness to the West lead to a steady flow of capital and resources into Yugoslavia, resulting in a rise in the standard of living for the majority of Yugoslavs during his presidency.

Tito was noted for his penchant for the finer things.  Although this was at odds with his socialist ideology, his “Hollywood’ lifestyle was admired by his citizens and celebrated by the West. 

One of the most extravagant examples was the now derelict, Haludovo Palace Hotel. Haludovo was an opulent accommodation and casino complex financed by Penthouse Magazine tycoon, Bob Guccione. Located on the Croatian island of Krk and designed in the Brutalist style by Croatian architect Boris Magas, Haludovo was a haven for the rich and famous. At a cost of 45 million US dollars, the mile long ‘Xanadu of glittering bulidings’ was a magnet for well-to-do American and British businessmen. Surrounded by the excesses of the ‘70’s lifestyle and Penthouse Pets as croupiers, this supreme statement of indulgent capitalism was ultimately irreconcilable with Socialism. Ultimately western guests failed to embrace the resort as expected and local residents were barred from gambling. The complex now lies in ruins. 


Belgian photographer Jan Kempenaers will be exhibiting his renowned ‘Spomenik’ series as part of the Monumentalism exhibition. Extensively exhibited across Europe and the US, the series comprises of 26 images depicting the futuristic memorials built in the former Yugoslavia commemorating WWII battles. The series will be shown as a large projection with accompanying interpretive text.

Drawing on local knowledge and a map from the ‘70’s depicting the whereabouts of the monuments, Kempenaers traversed the Balkans between 2006 and 2009 locating and photographing these abstract structures. Devoid of people, these powerful images were an Internet hit after his book ‘Spomenik’ (a Croatian word meaning monument) was released in 2010 with a flood of blogs dedicated to these futuristic sculptural forms.

Below is one of Kempenaers’ works, his photograph of Jasenovac – a memorial built to the victims of a concentration camp located in Slavonia in northeast Croatia. Designed by renowned architect and academic Bogdan Bogdanovic, Jasenovac commemorates the reportedly 100,000 mostly Serbs, Jews and Gypsies who were exterminated, mostly by hand, at the WWII concentration camp. Known for having been one of the most barbaric death camps for the extreme cruelty perpetrated, Jasenovac came to be known as the Auschwitz of The Balkans. Bogdanovic’s architectural design ‘Stone Flower’ was created to symbolize renewal and forgiveness. The monument was vandalized during the Balkans War but unlike many of the other damaged structures has since been restored.

Jan Kempenaers lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium and is currently affiliated to the School of Arts Ghent. He studied film and photography at the School of Arts in Ghent and completed his PhD in 2012. Recent solo exhibitions include Triennale de Photographie et Architecture #5, Brussels (2015), Jan Kempenaers, Breese Little, London (2013), Spomenik, Fowler Museum, L.A. (2013), I’m not tailgating, I’m drafting, Still Gallery, Belgium (2013), Jan Kempenaers: Spomenik, Liquid Courage Gallery, Nassau (2013), Kempenaers was a participating artist in Back to the Future, Breese Little, London (2012) and The Architecture Biennale, Venice, (2010).

Kempenares has released a number of publications featuring his photographic work, a selection are available through Melbourne bookstore Perimeter Books.

Jasenovac - from the Spomenik series by Jan Kempenaers

Jasenovac - from the Spomenik series by Jan Kempenaers


Over the coming weeks I will be profiling the artists who will be exhibiting in Monumentalism. Here is a brief synopsis of the exhibition.

The decaying monuments from Tito’s Yugoslavia form the backdrop for ‘Monumentalism’ - an exhibition curated by Anthony Bautovich at Kudos Gallery in November.

Memorials from the past, these abstract structures were commissioned by President Josip Broz Tito to convey a sense of confidence and strength in the new Socialist Republic. Designed and built in the ‘60s and ‘70s by leading architects and sculptors including Vojin Bakic and Bogan Bogdanovic, these stunning gestures to modernism are located at sites of battles and concentration camps commemorating the victims of fascism in WW11.

Devoid of signs of ideologies, war heroes or religions, these abstract forms were symbols of a modern and unified future. Established as recreational areas to visit and cultivate a sense of national and cultural togetherness, these remote and isolated memorials now lay idle. 

As the Balkans War took hold in the early ‘90s and Yugoslavia fell apart, the monuments became touchstones for the inherent hatreds from the past. Many of the monuments have been destroyed and even today the remaining memorials are being dismantled for their raw materials. The authorities turn a blind eye. From triumph to tragedy, these abandoned and decaying forms are a reflection of a broken and disbanded state. The original intention for the creation of the monuments has resulted in their demise. Politics created the monuments and politics has destroyed them.

Can the monuments continue to exist as sculptures? Can monuments derive a new meaning in a altered context? Do monuments have a purpose today?

The son of migrants from the former Yugoslavia, the curator’s interest in art from Eastern Europe was the catalyst for 'Monumentalism'. The exhibition will bring together International and Australian artists to respond to the emotional and social impact of the failings of the single party state.

Designed by sculptor Vojin Bakic in 1957, the 30 metre high monument ‘Kamenska’ was destroyed by vandals during the Balkans War.

Designed by sculptor Vojin Bakic in 1957, the 30 metre high monument ‘Kamenska’ was destroyed by vandals during the Balkans War.


I’m thrilled to have been awarded the 2016 Kudos Gallery Early Career Curator Award. I will be curating an exhibition this November at Kudos Gallery. The exhibition titled ‘Monumentalism’, which has as its backdrop the Tito commissioned memorials documented in the work Spomenik 2006-2009 by Belgian photographer Jan Kempenaers, will bring together International and Australian artists to respond to the emotional and social impact of the failings of the single party state.

I’m thrilled to have been awarded the 2016 Kudos Gallery Early Career Curator Award. I will be curating an exhibition this November at Kudos Gallery. The exhibition titled ‘Monumentalism’, which has as its backdrop the Tito commissioned memorials documented in the work Spomenik 2006-2009 by Belgian photographer Jan Kempenaers, will bring together International and Australian artists to respond to the emotional and social impact of the failings of the single party state.


 

My review of the Sydney Biennale - Cockatoo Island

2016 Sydney Biennale review by Anthony Bautovich

The Heartbeat of the Island

The boycott of the 2014 Sydney Biennale was an attempt to highlight the plight of refugees in Australia’s detention camps. Little has changed since the resulting withdrawal of founding sponsors Transfield, managers of Australia’s detention facilities. The camps remain, as does our indifference. What appears to have been affected is the level of financial support for The Biennale.

The theme of this year’s Biennale, ‘The Future Is Already Here – It’s just not Evenly Distributed’, is borrowed from a comment by science fiction author William Gibson. His quote refers to the evolution of technology and the fact that many people are denied access to fundamental resources, specifically the Internet. 

Artistic Director Stephanie Rosenthal has closely overseen her vision for the 2016 Biennale. Rosenthal, Chief curator at Hayward Gallery in London since 2007, has brought together 85 artists from 35 countries. Unlike previous Biennale curators she has chosen to live in Sydney since last September. This engagement with the locale is evident in her considered curation - her careful selection and grouping of artists into ‘Embassies of Thought’ emphasizes concepts rather than aesthetics. Dubbed the ‘Embassy of the Real’, Cockatoo Island is one of the major Embassy venues along with the AGNSW, MCA, Artspace and Carriageworks. With the paring back of this year’s program due to the downturn in funding, Rosenthal has cleverly repurposed a number of smaller venues forming a constellation of alternative, temporary sites scattered throughout Sydney’s inner east.

Stepping off the 301 bus at Circular Quay, I cross the street and ‘tap on’ at the dock. A ferry ride on the harbour is a simple pleasure for Sydneysiders. As Australians, our environment allows us freedom of choice, a diversity of possibilities and the entitlement to move freely. Passing between the Opera House and Harbour Bridge, the ferry filled with families, tourists and seniors heads towards Cockatoo island - the former penal colony and more recently Navy ship building facility provides an industrial backdrop for artwork by 21 artists: 2 are Australian. 

Leaving the ferry, I head along Burma Road towards the Upper Island. Dozens of tents line the right hand side of the thoroughfare. Resembling a military bivouac, the site is the Island’s permanent camping ground. As I approach the first cluster of installations housed in the Convict Precinct, the air is filled with a constant, resonant beat. The pulsing, low frequency punch is the sound of Room of Rhythms – Long Distance Relationship, 2016, a work by Turkish artist and musician Cevdet Erek. With a background in sound design and architecture, Erek is known for his site-specific installations. His work for the Biennale is immersive both aurally and emotionally, and penetrates the Upper Island. As Burma Road steepens, and I near the doorway to the Convict Barracks, the pulse of Erek’s work intensifies like the heartbeat of the Island.

Entering the Convict Barracks through a single door, leaving the reverberation behind, my senses turn to the work of Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota. Shiota’s installation, Conscious Sleep, 2016 is housed in a dark, damp rectangular room. A minimal amount of natural light emanates from two small windows and the entry and exit doors. The room has a musty odour. Small, dimmed stage lights are perched adjacent to the ceiling. The lights subtly draw attention to the hundreds of metres of tangled black thread cocooning a series of beds. Their unadorned, metal frames lean against the sandstone wall at an acute angle. The beds are generously spaced unlike those of the original convict inhabitants; the linen is a pristine vivid white. Dust has started to settle on the web of black thread. The capture of memory and emotion of the enveloping thread is a trait of Shiota’s practice. Living and working in Berlin for 20 years, Shiota is renowned for her intricate, large-scale creations, using everyday objects, weaving them into their determined domain.

Passing through the room, a permanent plaque is fixed alongside the exit door. It is an excerpt from a report on the conditions of convict life on Cockatoo Island, 1861. A portion of the text from the plaque reads “…double tiers of double sleeping berths, with coffin-like apertures opening upon a narrow central passage. In this passage are placed night-tubs for the common use of the men during the 12 hours they are locked up… He often sees them at the iron gratings gasping for fresh air from without, and he ‘wonders how they can live’.”

There are parallels to draw with our nation’s cruel past and the treatment of refugees – perhaps not in severity but certainly in principal. The difficulty in making work about this level of callousness is undeniable; nonetheless Shiota’s work has the capacity to trigger our emotions.

From the exit door, several metres across a common gravel courtyard is the former Mess Hall housing the work of Miguel Angel Rojas. The 70-year-old Columbian artist challenges the viewer’s perception with his subtle examination of the impact of colonialism on indigenous cultures. Piedra en el Zapato, 2016 – meaning ‘stone in the shoe’, is an understated and resolved work. 

The dominant feature of Rojas’ installation is the floor. Fashioned from earth and sand sourced from Cockatoo Island, the work is a painstaking reproduction of Victorian era tessellated floor tiles. Tonal browns and dirty white colours have been flawlessly arranged in a pattern, adding a performative element to the artwork. An enormous rock inhabits the right part of the room. Sandstone in appearance, the form has a number of Aboriginal style carvings on the upper surface. The tones embodied in the rock are identical to those of the tessellated tile pattern. The rock represents our indigenous peoples’ bond to the land and the heritage of their culture. Freshly welded prison like bars, suggestive of both the island’s history and the impact of colonization on the indigenous population, border the viewing area - preventing people from walking on the tiles. 

Since the opening, visitors have either purposely or unwittingly disturbed the pattern of the outer tiles. ‘Do Not Touch’ signs and an accompanying low-level perspex shield have been installed. Running repairs have been attempted – unsuccessfully. I sit down in the corner of the small viewing area, take in the work and watch the reaction of a number of visitors. One after another they enter and leave within a few seconds. The signs, for those who take the time to read them, have altered the nature of the work. The exactness and subtlety of this installation conveys a sense there is nothing to see.

Leaving the Convict Precinct and negotiating a precarious concrete stairway leading to the lower level of the Island, I am again confronted with the throbbing beat of Erek’s sound work. His constant aural reminder reorients one’s awareness of the environment. 

Rosenthal’s calculated curation of the work on the Upper Island and her ability to pair an artist’s work to a specific site is a tribute to her skills. The quiet contemplation of the Upper Island is a stark contrast to the installations framed by the gigantism of the Turbine Hall. The nature of a space dictates the scale of the work. Scale has become a key consideration when selecting and creating artwork for major exhibitions and Art Fairs. Size often equates to impact, however size can also suggest overblown and less thoughtful works.

Two key installations showing in the Hall are by three Asian artists – Lee Bul, Korakrit Arunanondchai and Boychild. South Korean Lee Bul is regarded as one of the most important female artists to emerge in the 90’s. She is perhaps best known for the work Rosenthal’s Biennale marketing department have been utilizing in their publicity, the much-photographed Diluvium made in 2014. Her work for the Sydney Biennale Willing to be Vulnerable, 2016, is a new work. Bul creates her artwork with a team of assistants in her residential studio complex in the Hills in Northern Seoul. Her site-specific installation, monumental in scale, fills a large section of the Turbine Hall, a vast 1640 square metre space. The artwork is an elaborate interconnected assemblage made of plastic, reflective metal surfaces, glass, LED lights and paint. The space is broken up into three indistinct sections by enormous sail-like plastic sheets, harboring motifs of cranes, air balloons, carousels and unidentifiable figures. The installation draws the viewer in with traces of the everyday yet is simultaneously surreal. A suspended silver Zeppelin-like object, suggestive of the ill-fated Hindenburg Airship, dominates the central portion of Bul’s installation.

Huge plastic floor sheets covered with painted abstract images are draped over stands adding an architectural dimension to the work. Paint has started to peel away from the plastic sheeting. The work is said to be interactive yet there are ‘do not touch’ and ‘do not walk’ signs placed throughout the space. The tent-like structures draw in small children who are told to move on by volunteers. These instructions are at odds with the catalogues’ claim that Willing to be Vulnerable is an interactive work. 

Bul examines the human condition and the concept of utopia, searching for what is out of reach - an investigation of the human capacity for destruction.

‘Our plans about utopia are undoubtedly going to fail. But as human beings, just because it’s destined to fail doesn’t mean we should stop dreaming about it. We need to keep trying, don’t we?’

Bul's work is installed in the bay next to artists Korakrit Arunanondchai and Boychild. Arunanondchai’s installation incorporates his video work, Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3, 2015-16 and the remnants of the opening night performance by transgender artist, Boychild.  

The big draw card on opening night was the one-off performance Untitled, Lip Sync#225, 2016 by Boychild. Hundreds of the Sydney art cognoscenti crammed around a lengthy runway to catch a glimpse. The artist’s eccentric moves and hypnotic gestures were recorded by a torrent of mobile phones. At the far end of the catwalk were a number of large containers of acrylic paint. The artists’ performance began with her smearing herself in primary coloured paint and rolling along the runway. Her gestural performance, painting the denim-covered platform with the contours of her body was viewed simultaneously on the enormous LED screen.

‘The character and body of the artist acts as a vessel for the work: flesh is treated as canvas, and an ever-evolving palette of makeup provides a tool for communication’

The coloured paints on the artists’ body intermingle, blending together over the course of the performance. Terminating at the end of the catwalk, they read as a tonal brown. Through her contortions and unique movements, Boychild took on the character of Naga, a mythical serpent featured in the Korakrit Arunanondchai video that screened prior to the performance.  

At the head of the catwalk was a huge ‘lounge room’ set up featuring oversized beanbag like denim-covered cushions. The cushions are arranged in front of the massive LED screen showing the video. Arunanondchai’s work is beautifully shot featuring quick cuts and fast paced editing to a background of strident dance music. English subtitles draw your eye to the bottom of the screen. 

The video is shot using drones and hand held cameras. It is overloaded with an eclectic mix of images ranging from pop culture references to billboards, cityscapes, technology and animals. His pastiche of styles blurs the line between reality and fantasy. The barrage of information lacks a linear narrative structure prompting the audience to form their own interpretation of the work. In the video, Arunanondchai appears with a group of friends all dressed in his signature acid wash denim. They perform formation dance routines that suggest a Thai boy band and pop video clips. Both Arunanondchai and Boychild ‘wear paint’ as if they are themselves artworks in the process of being created. 

Heading towards the ferry dock the heartbeat of the Island starts to fade. I think about how technology and the pace of life have influenced the way we perceive and respond to our environment. Having time to stop and contemplate is becoming a luxury. I think about Lee Bul’s reference to an unattainable utopia and about the simplicity of Rojas’ work; its ability to evoke awareness of dispossession and marginality. As the ferry heads back to the Quay and the figure of Cockatoo Island recedes, my thoughts drift to another Island to the North of Australia.

 

Bibliography:

Akel, J, 2015, The Many Faces of Boychild, V Magazine, viewed 22nd April 2016

Bailey, S, 2015, Art Paper Magazine. Jan/Feb. Vol. 39 Issue 1, p68

Carlos/Ishikawa, 2016, Korakrit Arunanondchai, viewed 28th April 2016,
< http://www.carlosishikawa.com>

Close, R, 2015, ArtAsiaPacific. Nov/Dec, Issue 96, p146-147

Erek, C, 2016, viewed 25th April 2016, < https://cevdeterek.com>

Fletcher, M, 2015, Mirrorcity (UK), Art Review, viewed 23rd April 2016
< https://medium.com>

Lehmann Maupin, 2016, viewed 20th April 2016, <http://www.leebul.com>

Masters, H, 2011, Where I Work Cevdet Erek, Art Asia Pacific, Nov/Dec, Issue 76, viewed 28th April 2016

Milliss, I, 2016, Let's boycott all biennales!, Artlink, Issue 36:1

Sesser, S, 2011, The Art Assembly Line, The Wall Street Journal

Sicardi, 2015, viewed 19th April 2016, <http://www.sicardi.com>

Suchin, P, 2014, Art Monthly. Oct, Issue 380, p24-25.

Teo, W, 2014, Lee Bul, Autumn & Winter issue of ArtReview Asia, viewed 22nd April 2016

Xuan Mai Ardia, C, 2015, Dystopian Utopia: Korean artist Lee Bul at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Art Radar Journal

Xuan Mai Ardia, C, 2016, The Art of Lee Bul: Of Cyborgs, Monsters and Utopian Landscapes, The Culture Trip, viewed 25th April 2016

Yoshimoto, M, Beyond ‘Japanese/Women Artists’, Nobuho Nagasawa and Chiharu Shiota, Third Text, 2014. Vol. 28, No. 1, 67–81

Zelenko, M, 2013, Boychild Talks Performance Art, Hood By Air, and Her Greatest Fears, viewed 19th April 2016